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flaglog:

Salesópolis, since 1952
Hoo boy, are you ready for this? Green for forests and meadows, yellow for wealth, white for peace and harmony, red for blood spilled in defense of democratic principles, blue for hospitality. The 26 stars on the white band represent the neighbourhoods of the city, the gold star represents the state of São Paulo, and the map of Brazil represents “feelings of Brazilianness”.
You know, sometimes simpler is better.

flaglog:

Salesópolis, since 1952

Hoo boy, are you ready for this? Green for forests and meadows, yellow for wealth, white for peace and harmony, red for blood spilled in defense of democratic principles, blue for hospitality. The 26 stars on the white band represent the neighbourhoods of the city, the gold star represents the state of São Paulo, and the map of Brazil represents “feelings of Brazilianness”.

You know, sometimes simpler is better.

Chillax @8tracks: Sunday DnB by ResidualSound.

Chillax @8tracks: Sunday DnB by ResidualSound.

Ho, tre freneza! Bonege!
Daaaaaaamn, girl. One of my few favorite songs!

(Source: youtube.com)

I rarely saw an abstract art as particularly beautiful or meaningful, but these ones I think are beautiful indeed.

mystic-revelations
:

Artworks by Ryan Coleman

(via j-mindreau)

Why isn’t taxation stealing?

Here we find a glimpse of why you have to pay taxes, before you complain about it.

Answer by Carrie Cutler:

If taxation is stealing, so is the use of public utilities and services (fire stations, roadways, postal services, police officers/stations, jails, an army, bridges, public transportation, some hospitals, some sewer and water systems, the courts system, various health and safety inspectors, regulatory bodies for finance and banks, etc.)

You may not think explicitly about your use of those services, but you use them every day. The legal system guards your safety from people who are convicted of a variety of crimes. Your average John or Jane Q. Public does not have the time, energy or training to pursue criminals, to defend themselves and/or to confine someone. Moreover, allowing individual justice gets you things like lynchings because the standard of justice is whatever the hell the person with the biggest gun says so. (Trigger warnings most DEFINITELY apply. See: Lynching Photography in America)

The power, water, sewer, phone, electricity, and internet systems you rely on are sometimes outright public utilities and other times regulated for safety and regularity by civil servants. Someone has to inspect the buildings, roads, and bridges to prevent them from collapsing. Someone has to be there to prosecute if they do so negligently. (Ditto on this link. See: Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire)

Someone has to come if your house burns down, or if you’re robbed, or to stand ready and organized for defense of the US against invasion, terrorism, well organized crime and/or the threat of succession. And organizing and overseeing those things cannot be done by single individuals. There have to be rules, hierarchies, command structures, people who do these things full time, communication and/or all the organizational features required for coordination. There also have to be penalties for not obeying those structures, because a pure democracy is so inefficient that you can’t get a damn thing done in it.

You cannot be a whole nation by yourself, and you cannot live collectively without contributing to the public good.

The sad fact of the matter is that when a property, item or service is declared public, people tend to assume that maintenance on it is someone else’s problem. Each pursuing their own interests, they deplete or ruin that shared property. (See: Tragedy of the commons)

I get argued with by (usually) libertarians that they don’t like the things done with their taxes and/or that they feel what is being done is inefficient. Okay, I’m there with you in terms of personal dislike for some of the uses of my tax money and/or frustration with inefficient, stupid uses of public money.

Anyone who looks at public organization (or has tried to organize a large group of people) can tell you that people shirk, lie, manipulate, steal, refuse to do their duty, and/or break things out of petty vengeance. No one manager or person can keep the organization from having problems or even dissolving if the individuals in it don’t feel like complying and aren’t motivated to do so.

That’s what the stick (the legal system) is for. The carrot is all the services you get.

Please read the following as an expression of frustration with having those arguments.

The solution is not a return to the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries.

I mean, really, did you want to work at a time before OSHA, modern oversight, and modern standards for justice? Do you know what that time looks like?

The following are from Jacob Riis’ book How the Other Half Lives, published around 1890. The pictures are studies from the tenements in New York.

Book notes suggest that many of the homeless children were abandoned orphans were born out of wedlock and left in the street as infants. They tended to band together in small groups for survival. Orphanages were not necessarily public or publicly funded, and as a result were both few and far between. Some states, such as New York, did provide state subsidies, but the volume of orphans were too large for the system. Private charitable organizations tried very hard to raise enough donations, but were unable to do so. As a result, there were hundreds or thousands of orphans in NYC alone roaming the streets in small gangs.

In this essay, the author estimates that something like 110,000 children were being seen by various orphanages and asylums in NYC. Only 21% of that total were seen in public institutions which received state funds. (See: http://www.socialwelfarehistory.com/programs/orphanage-part-1/)



Homeless children.



Homeless children.



Child worker, garment factory.



A peddler and his bed.



A home in the Five Points neighborhood.



A tenement yard.

The following are from the work of Lewis Hine.

Note: mandatory school for children was not accomplished until 1938, despite laws on the education of children dating back to the 1800s. Limits to the working day did not become the law in the US until the same time, when Roosevelt forced the issue as a part of his second New Deal, in 1938. (See: Fair Labor Standards Act )

Before that point, there were few functional limits to employing children and how long they could work. Hine’s work played a significant role in this process.



These are oyster shuckers. Josie (6), Bertha (6) and Sophia (10), taken at Maggioni Canning Co., Port Royal, South Carolina. Taken early 20th century.



These are breaker boys. They picked coal out of the chutes beneath their feet (right of photo), breathing in coal dust and being cut by the coal. Coal is highly toxic, and the cuts tended to fester, sometimes requiring amputation. Coal dust causes severe lung damage and cancer. Taken in South Pittston, Pennsylvania, circa 1910.



Laura Petty, 6. Taken July 7, 1909 in Rock Creek, Maryland. She is paid two cents a box of berries and averages two boxes a day.



Mary, 4, last name unknown. Oyster shucker.


Boy, name unknown. Lost arm running a saw in a box factory, 1909.



Girl working at Carolina Cotton Mill, 1908.

You get my drift. You may not like paying taxes, but the money is used to prevent these sorts of things through regulation, inspection, the enforcement of labor/housing/child abuse law, services offered to employees, and laws protecting employee safety.

Why child labor? Because it is the most obvious of the forms of problems caused by an unregulated labor and human relations system.

The system doesn’t always work, but I thought people should see pictures of a time before the current system so they have something to compare it to.
View Answer on Quora

"Real sex is not when you pay or are being paid for it. Real sex is when all parties involved consented and enjoy it without the need to force it or be paid in any other way. It is freedom in its truest sense. Sex is the means AND the goal for everybody. The sex itself is the vehicle. The sex itself is the payment. That way we know that someone has felt the pure, unadulterated sex and sex is, at that time, being the ultimate everything for that someone."

my 2 bits…

Check out this mix on @8tracks: Painfully Sweet by trak273.

Check out this mix on @8tracks: Painfully Sweet by trak273.

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Slick.